7 Steps to Prepare for a .Net Job Interview

Our department has gone through some changes lately; some changes have affected the process we follow when interviewing. Since I know I will be doing lots of interviewing this month, I have been thinking a lot about what we have done right in our process, and what can be improved. Here is the process that we go through in our department to prepare for interviews.

1. Define a Process

As an interviewer, one of my objectives throughout the interviewing process is to provide as much consistency as possible. Define a process that is consistent and repeatable. Then, when comparing one candidate to another, you will be comparing them win the same questions, with the same process. It will also mean that you are always prepared for the next interview cycle with little effort.

2. Write A Great Job Description

The Job Description that you write is what will let your recruiters, consulting companies, and candidates know exactly what you are looking for. It is important to list everything that you are looking for:

  • Technical skills (i.e. – Visual Studio .Net 2005, ASP.Net Ajax, SQL Server 2005, etc.)
  • Specific Education Requirements (i.e. – Bachelor’s Degree Preferred, etc.)
  • Certifications (i.e. MCSD, PMP, etc)
  • Methodologies (i.e. – SDLC, Agile, SCRUM, etc.)
  • Years of Experience (i.e. – Junior level with 2 years experience or less, etc.)
  • Project Management Skills (i.e. – 3 years managing projects with a budget of $1M or greater)
  • Communication Skills (i.e. – Written, Verbal, Able to work with clients to collect detailed requirements, etc.)
  • Other Intangibles – (i.e. – Energetic, “Do It Right” over “Get It Done”, able to work on multiple projects, etc.)

3. Offer A Competitive Rate

You need to know what the people you are looking to hire are worth. If you are not offering a competitive rate, then you will not be able to attract, obtain, and retain the talent you are looking for. If you can, research market rates for your open position, particularly with your competitors.

4. Follow A Proven Recruitment Process

Whether you have a business process for recruitment, have a third party company that manages it, work with recruitment and consulting companies, or post resumes on Dice and Monster, you need to get the work out about your open position and collect those resumes. These sources need to align with the types of candidates you are looking for. Some sources are for specific technologies or skills, so be sure what you are looking for and what your source can offer match.

5. Screen Your Candidates

Once your open position is posted, you will be flooded with resumes. With all the other things you are busy doing, it will be difficult to keep up with the influx. You will not be able to schedule face-to-face interviews with everyone. The best way to whittle down your pile of prospective candidates is to phone screen the candidates. Prioritize your candidates in the order in which you want to interview them. Then you phone screen them in groups of three to five at a time. The phone screens should be short, ask a wide variety of questions, and be sure the candidate meets the minimum qualifications. Be sure you stay consistent – ask the same questions, and stay with the same people screening the candidates. As you find candidates you want to see more of, schedule them for a face-to-face interview.

6. Script Your Face to Face Interview

You should have a planned script that outlines your face-to-face interviews. Knowing exactly what you want to cover in advance and following the script will keep the process consistent and make it easier to rate the candidates. The steps we follow to conduct an interview will be the topic of another post.

7. Plan your Questions in Advance

In the interview process, it is a good idea to have more than one person interview the candidate (it would be even better if you can interview your candidate all together). Write down your questions in advance and assigning certain sections of questions to each person. You can compile your questions from my .Net Hiring Managers Resource, or from your own resources. Make a worksheet of the questions, with space to jot down notes about their answers and your thoughts during the interview. It might help to come up with a rating scale of 1 to 10 to rate the answers you get. Again, this will make rating the candidate objective, consistent, and easy to gather and summarize the opinions of all the interviewers.

Have I missed anything? Do you disagree with anything here? What process do you follow? Do you have a best practice that you depend on that is not in these steps?

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